New Movies: Release Calendar for September 3 and Where to Watch

As theaters begin showing signs of life and streaming and VOD options stay hefty, IndieWire is here to guide you through all of your new viewing options each week.

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As theaters begin showing signs of life and streaming and VOD options stay hefty, there are more movies (and platforms to watch them on!) than ever to sift through, and IndieWire is here to help you do just that each week.

This week’s selections include the latest from the Marvel Cinematic Universe, a wide variety of festival hits turned at-home options, a new take on an old fairy tale, a trio of bonafide IndieWire Critic’s Picks, and more. Each film is now available in a theater near you or in the comfort of your own home (or, in some cases, both, the convenience of it all). Browse your options below.

Week of August 30 – September 5

New Films in Theaters

As new movies open in theaters during the COVID-19 pandemic, IndieWire will continue to review them whenever possible. We encourage readers to follow the safety precautions provided by CDC and health authorities. Additionally, our coverage will provide alternative viewing options whenever they are available.

“Anne at 13,000 Ft.” (directed by Kazik Radwanski) — IndieWire Critic’s Pick
Distributor: Cinema Guild
Where to Find It: Select NY theaters, with LA following on September 10

When we first meet Anne (Deragh Campbell), she’s in two places at once. Gently cupping a butterfly in her hands, she ushers it onto a young girl’s shoulder as other children look on, mesmerized by her ability to capture the elusive creature. Without warning, the camera cuts from a moment of calm to one of exhilaration — Anne is preparing to jump out of a moving plane for her best friend’s bachelorette party. The two scenes are interwoven to the point where we don’t know where one ends and one begins, like someone trying to piece together formless fragments of distant memories.

It’s a manic introduction to “Anne at 13,000 Ft.,” Canadian director Kazik Radwanski’s portrait of an unsteady woman struggling to navigate her everyday life, and it sets us up for 75 minutes of fits and starts as we are jerked from one episode to the next. While this filmmaking technique is anxiety-inducing and at times frustrating to watch, Campbell’s staggering performance becomes the film’s center of gravity, her captivating sense of chaos and complexity giving the audience emotional motion sickness as her moods shift between extremes. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Faya Dayi”

Merkhana Films

“Faya Dayi” (directed by Jessica Beshir) 
Distributor: Janus Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters

Shot entirely in stunning black and white, “Faya Dayi” opens with a long shot of a somewhat amorphous, barren landscape, nighttime, dark, crickets providing the only soundtrack, and in the distance a lone figure running playfully, starts to come into view. We see that it’s a child, as he or she runs past the camera. Cut to bewitching shots of elders indoors, some faceless, some not, chanting, giving thanks to God, separating khat leaves from their stems, and, in some cases, pounding them, as incense burns in a pot, the smoke it emits, thick and intense. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Mogul Mowgli” (directed by Bassam Tariq) 
Distributor: Strand Releasing
Where to Find It: Select theaters in NY and LA, national rollout to follow

Riz Ahmed exudes a never-before-seen vulnerability, both physically and emotionally. He isn’t the feisty Ruben of “Sound of Metal,” but an older man whose career and family prospects haven’t worked out, and who struggles to hide his bald spots (and eventually, his ailment). He projects aggression, but Tariq unearths his misery and the frustration he turns inward by making him look diminutive in the frame.

Some elements of the story are autobiographical — like Zed, Ahmed is a British Pakistani rapper — but “Mogul Mowgli” is also a critical mirror. In 2020, Ahmed released the track “Toba Tek Singh” and Zed spends his physical therapy trying to conceive of a song just like it. When he searches for a follow-up lyric to “Let the Tec ring,” he doesn’t immediately find it, but the quadrisyllabic rhythm makes it obvious to the audience, who have borne witness to his visions; “Toba Tek Singh!” we want to yell back. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings” (directed by Destin Daniel Cretton) 
Distributor: Disney
Where to Find It: Theaters

It starts with a legend: many centuries ago, a seemingly regular man was gifted with a set of 10 magical rings (origins: unknown) that allowed him to tap into a power beyond all human comprehension. For nearly a thousand years, this gifted man (played by Tony Leung, one of the world’s most gifted men) used the rings to gather the wealth and influence he desired, plus an army of decidedly meat-headed meanies who lived to carry out his wishes. But by the power of love — or at least, the necessary exposition such a love story brings with it — the man was temporarily freed from his nefarious activities, until old enemies returned and pushed him to once again tap into both the rings and the bad attitude they inspired in him.

Such is where Destin Daniel Cretton’s alternately fresh and convoluted Marvel Cinematic Universe debut, “Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings,” begins, and with a cute kid being told the story of a money-mad bad guy who changed (kind of) to make the world a better place (sort of). No wonder young Shang-Chi is so conflicted: his literal origin story is messy. Thankfully, Cretton zips past this awkward (yet necessary) opening to bring us into Shang-Chi’s (or “Shaun,” as he’s gone by since he slipped into America and attempted to assimilate) current world, which is a far cry from any fairy tale involving magic, mystery, and mean dads. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Michael Greyeyes appears in Wild Indian by Lyle Mitchell Corbine Jr., an official selection of the U.S. Dramatic Competition at the 2021 Sundance Film Festival. Courtesy of Sundance Institute | photo by Eli Born.All photos are copyrighted and may be used by press only for the purpose of news or editorial coverage of Sundance Institute programs. Photos must be accompanied by a credit to the photographer and/or 'Courtesy of Sundance Institute.' Unauthorized use, alteration, reproduction or sale of logos and/or photos is strictly prohibited.

“Wild Indian”

Sundance

“Wild Indian” (directed by Lyle Mitchell Corbine, Jr.) 
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital platforms

“Some time ago… there was an Ojibwe man who got a little sick and wandered West.” So begins Lyle Mitchell Corbine, Jr.’s bleak and disquietingly self-loathing “Wild Indian,” which adapts that folkloric tone into the airless language of a contemporary serial-killer drama. We learn that the Ojibwe man was a little sicker than his legend suggested.

When we meet Makwa, he’s as a troubled pre-teen in the 1980s, when he lives in an oppressively gray stretch of middle American nowhere with abusive parents. Played in these formative years by a remarkable young actor named Phoenix Wilson — whose punctured tire of a voice sounds like on the brink of crying over a sense of dispossession he doesn’t have words to describe — Makwa is held in the grip of an anger that seems much older than he is. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“Yakuza Princess” (directed by Vicente Amorim) 
Distributor: Magnet Releasing
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital platforms

The legal drinking age in most countries around the globe is 18 years old; Brazil is among those nations. Japan, however, makes their young people wait until they turn 20 for the right to booze it up. Yet, in nonsensical fashion, when Akemi (singer-songwriter Masumi), the Japanese-born, Brazilian-raised heroine of Vicente Amorim’s “Yakuza Princess,” toasts in front of her late grandfather’s portrait, she follows American regulation and celebrates finally turning 21 as a major milestone. Such a seemingly trivial detail is indicative of the astounding incoherence and misguided international ambitions of this subpar action saga.

Gruesome dismemberment at a family party opens the film, adapted from the graphic novel “Samurai Shiro” by Danilo Beyruth. That incident in Osaka two decades prior landed Akemi and her grandfather in Sao Paolo — text on screen explains the South American city hosts the largest Japanese community outside of the island state. But while having Brazilian creators at the helm, the country serves as an inconsequential backdrop that could have easily been substituted by any other urban center. Read IndieWire’s full review.

“The Year of the Everlasting Storm” (directed by various filmmakers) — IndieWire Critic’s Pick
Distributor: Neon
Where to Find It: Select theaters

From the moment this pandemic began, it’s been difficult to totally gauge its toll. It would be easy to say the daily ups and downs have played out like a film, but at least you can often see the end of a film coming before it arrives. It’s the way they follow easy, familiar tracks that makes them so inviting, so comforting.

“The Year of the Everlasting Storm,” an evocative anthology film capturing the human scale of the pandemic, in personal detail, offers a different kind of comfort. From all parts of the globe, seven filmmakers, ranging from David Lowery to Jafar Panahi, helm seven distinct stories, each grappling through their art with the unknowability of the past year-plus. They turn to hyperactive animation, personal and investigative documentary filmmaking, a meditative art installation, and some heartbreaking fictional storytelling to vocalize every facet of this worldwide crisis. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Year of the Everlasting Storm

“The Year of the Everlasting Storm”

Neon

Also available this week:

“The Gateway” (directed by Michele Civetta) 
Distributor: Lionsgate
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital platforms

“Karen” (directed by Coke Daniels) 
Distributor: Quiver Distribution
Where to Find It: Theaters, plus various VOD and digital platforms

“The Madness Inside Me” (directed by Matthew Berkowitz) 
Distributor: Gravitas Ventures
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital platforms

“Saving Paradise” (directed by Jay Silverman) 
Distributor: Vertical Entertainment
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital platforms

“We Need to Do Something” (directed by Sean King O’Grady) 
Distributor: IFC Midnight
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital platforms

“Who You Think I Am” (directed by Safy Nebbou
Distributor: Cohen Media Group
Where to Find It: Select theaters in NY and LA, national rollout to follow

“Zone 414” (directed by Andrew Baird) 
Distributor: Saban Films
Where to Find It: Select theaters, plus various VOD and digital platforms

New Films on VOD and Streaming, Including Premium Platforms

“Cinderella” (directed by Kay Cannon)
Distributor: Amazon
Where to Find It: Streaming on Amazon Prime Video

Easily one of the most adapted fairy tales, there aren’t too many new avenues to go down when telling Cinderella’s story. Name a “fresh” angle and there’s likely already a film or a television series that has adapted that same “clever” idea for its own use. Even the marketing and promotion for the newest version of “Cinderella,” which all lean heavily into the film as being a contemporary take on the classic story, has been done before, and recently: look no further than “Ever After” or “A Cinderella Story.” So with the deck quite literally stacked against the film, it’s remarkable just how effervescent and charming Kay Cannon’s “Cinderella” actually is. Read IndieWire’s full review.

Michael Keaton and Stanley Tucci appear in Worth by Sara Colangelo, an official selection of the Premieres program at the 2020 Sundance Film Festival. Courtesy of Sundance Institute.All photos are copyrighted and may be used by press only for the purpose of news or editorial coverage of Sundance Institute programs. Photos must be accompanied by a credit to the photographer and/or 'Courtesy of Sundance

“Worth”

Sundance

“Worth” (directed by Sara Colangelo) — IndieWire Critic’s Pick
Distributor: Netflix
Where to Find It: Streaming on Netflix

One part character study, one part journey through bureaucratic bullshit and political machinations, Sara Colangelo’s “Worth” brings to life the story of Ken Feinberg’s (Michael Keaton) seemingly unwinnable mission. Portrayed by Keaton in an unflashy, wholly impressive turn, Feinberg is a reason-driven legal wonk who, despite not believing that anything can ever be truly fair, still thinks the law and rational thinking can get people at least part of the way there.

Colangelo assembles a stacked supporting cast to assist Keaton in enlivening the proceedings: Amy Ryan is his righthand woman Camille Brios, Shunori Ramanathan is a tenderhearted new associate who was nearly in the towers on that…

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